Elizabeth II's television father: “The royal family should be delighted with 'The Crown'”

The relevance of The Crown can be measured by the number of people who have an opinion about the series.

Oliver Thansan
Oliver Thansan
27 November 2023 Monday 16:38
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Elizabeth II's television father: “The royal family should be delighted with 'The Crown'”

The relevance of The Crown can be measured by the number of people who have an opinion about the series. One day it is the British government of the day that gives its opinion. Another is Diana Spencer's brother. Then the close circles of King Charles or the Oscar winner Judi Dench get involved. Last week, in fact, it was Isabel II's press secretary who took a stand against the series produced by Netflix. And whose turn is it now? From Jared Harris, the actor who played King George IV in the first season.

In an interview with the BBC's Today programme, the actor known for series such as Mad Men, Chernobyl and Foundation was asked about The Crown and, in his opinion, the Windsors should be the opposite of upset: "There is always the question of whether "This or that should be told or if it's disrespectful in any way and my opinion is that I think the royal family should be delighted because it humanises them."

When Jared Harris signed on for the series written by Peter Morgan, known for his work on The Queen, and directed in the first episodes by Stephen Daldry, the author of The Hours, he was aware that it would be a bombshell from the beginning. After filming the first season, ahead of the start of the premiere in November 2016, they did a good report with stylish photographs for a magazine: “Everyone knew there would be tremendous interest. Vogue did a photo spread and when fashion magazines are interested in your series, you know it will be taken to the next level.”

Harris' statements come at an opportune time after criticism from Dicki Arbiter, Queen Elizabeth II's press secretary during the Windsor image crisis after Diana's death. He said The Crown had “lost its way” with dramatic licences. First, because of the bad taste of writing scenes like that of the then Prince Charles communicating Diana's death to her children. “It has been very insensitive, very unnecessary,” he said. This is still a very “delicate” topic for Guillermo and Enrique to show on television.

Second, for what he basically describes as lies when narrating the events around the death of the town's princess: “The scenes of Carlos and his mother, in which he lets it slip that she would want Diana to be brought back in a van from Harrods don't make any sense." She bothered him because he was present those days, working as press secretary for the queen, and Isabel “was the first” to accept that she had to offer a plane to transport the body of the mother of her grandchildren.

In addition, The Crown is in the midst of airing its final season, the last episodes of which will premiere on December 14, and has received the worst reviews to date. What do the detractors argue? Which, after being an elegant portrait of the British Royal House and a way of approaching the history of the United Kingdom, has adopted a more soap opera approach since Diana Spencer appeared in the life of Elizabeth II. “Suspension of disbelief can never be established. Diana's ghost dances among ruins,” stated the prestigious newspaper The Guardian.