Thanksgiving: If the feast is back, so are the leftovers

We have all learned more about how to enjoy the holidays in uncertain times than we thought. Many of us made smaller Thanksgiving meals and had Zoom celebrate them. With the right precautions, this year we may see more real-life Thanksgiving gatherings and plates full of all the trimmings.

Thanksgiving: If the feast is back, so are the leftovers

We have all learned more about how to enjoy the holidays in uncertain times than we thought. Many of us made smaller Thanksgiving meals and had Zoom celebrate them. With the right precautions, this year we may see more real-life Thanksgiving gatherings and plates full of all the trimmings.

Merve Dikici
Merve Dikici
22 November 2021 Monday 15:11
77 Reads
Thanksgiving: If the feast is back, so are the leftovers

We have all learned more about how to enjoy the holidays in uncertain times than we thought. Many of us made smaller Thanksgiving meals and had Zoom celebrate them. With the right precautions, this year we may see more real-life Thanksgiving gatherings and plates full of all the trimmings.

The good news is that there may be more leftovers than you think.

The bad news is that turkey and other foods are more expensive than ever. We want to make smart choices with every bite.

According to Jay Jandrain, Butterball CEO and President, Turkeys will be larger this year due to labor shortages and delays in processing plants.

Put those leftovers to use:

TURKEY

There are so many ways to make use of leftover turkey. There are many ways to use up leftover turkey. You can use it in your favorite pasta dish, or salad . You can shred it and use it in a lasagna. You can make quesadillas and enchiladas with it. Make turkey hash or add chopped turkey to the chili.

Don't forget about the carcass, the bits and pieces that you can use to make turkey stock.

CRANBERRY SAUCCE

It's a good idea to put it in a turkey sandwich. However, it also makes a great accompaniment for roasted chicken next week. The best way to preserve the strawberry sauce is in the refrigerator for at least two weeks.

Blend it in a blender to make a post-Thanksgiving smoothie. Blend it into a drink, such as a Cranberry Orange Shrimp. Serve it with meatballs.

GRAVY

For an extra flavor boost, you can stir the gravy into a soup or stew. For a quick poutine, drizzle it on French fries or roasted potato and top with some melted cheese. It can be used in a casserole or turkey pot pie.

You can freeze leftover gravy in an airtight container up to 3 months. Drizzle it over biscuits. Mix it with your chicken or dumplings. Sprinkle some on top of meatloaf.

VEGETABLES

You can roast vegetables such as sweet potatoes, sweet potatoes, and brussels sprouts. Blend them with some broth, some cream and any extra fresh herbs. You can make a vegetable purée from the broth.

As with soups, stews, and pastas: Add the vegetables to the pot. Add the vegetables to a cream-based sauce, or an olive tapenade vinaigrette. Make frittatas from them by chopping them.

MASHED POOTTOES AND STuffING

You can use leftover mashed potatoes to make Shepherd's Pie, Cottage Pie or other desserts. You can use them to make moussaka. Make turkey and mashed potato croquettes. Make mashed potato pancakes by flattening them.

You can do the same with leftovers.

You can make crispy savory patties from leftover mashed potatoes or stuffing by using a wafflemaker. You can also "panini-up" leftover sandwiches using an indoor grill or this machine. You can also stuff portobello mushrooms caps with stuffing and sprinkle some cheese on top. Roast until they are hot and done through.

BREAD

Leftover bread, even if it's become a little stale, can be used for croutons,breadcrumbs, bruschetta, bread pudding or French toast. If you're using it for sandwiches, consider toasting the slices to bring out their best flavor and texture. Check that the bread's seasonings match its new purpose.

PUMPKIN

Additional pumpkin cans? You can also make pancakes, pumpkin muffins or other recipes using this pumpkin cream cheese brownie or pumpkin spice gingerbread.

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Here's a sample recipe for leftovers

LEFTOVER TURKEY POOT PIE

Serves 6

1 sheet of frozen puff pastry (half of a 17.3-ounce box) defrosted in the fridge

1/4 cup (1 1/2 stick) unsalted butter

1 cup chopped fresh mushrooms

1/2 cup chopped onion

1/2 cup chopped carrots

1/3 cup all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon kosher Salt

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

2 cups chicken or turkey broth

1/2 cup heavy cream, half-and-half or whole milk

3 cups of shredded chicken or turkey

1/2 cup fresh, canned, or frozen corn; they don’t need to be thawed.

1 cup fresh, canned or frozen peas

Preheat the oven to 425°F. Melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Cook the butter over medium heat. Add the mushrooms, onion, and carrots. Stir occasionally for 7 minutes until the liquid has evaporated. You should see the vegetables just beginning to turn golden.

Continue to stir the flour, salt, and pepper until all the vegetables have been coated in flour. Slowly add the cream and broth, stirring often, until the mixture becomes thick and bubbly. This should take approximately 5 minutes.

Stir together the turkey, corn, and peas. The pot pie mixture should be filled into a 9-inch pan.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the puff pastry dough. You can make 4 to 6 shapes with a cookie cutter. Then, use a brush of milk or cream to attach the shapes to the crust. I used a leaf cookie cutter.

If the edges are too low, place the puff pastry on top of the filling. You can make steam escape by using a sharp knife if you didn't cut any shapes out of the crust.

Bake the pie for 20-30 minutes, or until it is golden brown. Once everything is bubbly, remove from oven. Allow the pie to cool for 10 minutes before cutting and serving. The pie will not cut perfectly; this is part of its charm.

Updated: 22.11.2021 15:21
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