The Government becomes the main opposition to Carlos Mazón

The new general secretary of the PSPV, Diana Morant, already pointed out in her debut at the congress held a few days ago in Benicàssim, that the Government would be an “ally” of the opposition to “protect the social achievements” of recent years.

Oliver Thansan
Oliver Thansan
01 April 2024 Monday 10:28
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The Government becomes the main opposition to Carlos Mazón

The new general secretary of the PSPV, Diana Morant, already pointed out in her debut at the congress held a few days ago in Benicàssim, that the Government would be an “ally” of the opposition to “protect the social achievements” of recent years. “A containment dam”, in the words of the also Minister of Science, Innovation and Universities, to confront the legislative changes proposed by PP and Vox this legislature.

A day later, Morant announced that the Executive was considering taking to court some laws that had not yet been approved - simply announced - such as the Law of Concord or the Law of Educational Freedom, the latter, on the grounds that it leaves the Valencian in a situation of weakness. against Spanish in schools.

Yesterday, the Minister of Territorial Policy and Democratic Memory, Ángel Víctor Torres, detailed that this Tuesday he will submit to the Council of Ministers a “complete report” on the development of the Memory Law and what is happening in this regard in autonomies governed by PP and Vox with initiatives that call into question this state regulation.

Torres explained that the analysis has examined the law already approved in Aragon and the legislative initiatives that are being processed in the Valencian Community and Castilla y León. In the case of the Valencian Community, the bill has already entered Les Corts and they want to approve it by emergency procedure before the session of the regional parliament ends this summer. Of course, the PP has said that it is open to negotiating amendments with the opposition.

The government movement was already expected both in the Consell chaired by Carlos Mazón and in the parliamentary groups that have promoted this norm that aims to “recognize all victims of violence, social, political, terrorism or ideological persecution besieged in the Community Valenciana during the period between 1931 and up to the present day.”

Minister Torres' announcement and the previous words of Diana Morant, now as the new leader of the PSPV, denote the Government's firm intention to enter into hand-to-hand combat with the Consell of Carlos Mazón. With an opposition that has not yet recovered from the bitter defeat at the polls last year, the strongest political enemy that the Valencian executive faces is the Government of Pedro Sánchez.

This scenario also contributes to the fact that one of the key people in Diana Morant's new team is the Government delegate, Pilar Bernabé, who confronts the Valencian Consell every week about the Government's action in the Valencian Community. Bernabé is responsible for the institutional area of ​​the PSPV.

The PSPV does not have its new leader in Les Corts and, in Compromís - which has not yet started a renewal process after 28-M - it is not clear who should assume the leadership or even where the political project has to evolve. Valencianist. In fact, with a fairly faithful parliamentary majority - PP and Vox seem to know how to combine their differences and strengthen their points of union - Carlos Mazón seems comfortable in the Chamber.

In this context, it seems that the Valencian president's biggest headaches may come from La Moncloa, especially now that Morant has taken the reins of the PSPV and the Government seems willing to engage in an ideological battle on issues such as the Concord Law.

After the minister's announcement, the Mazón government avoided responding. Yes, the Vox spokesperson in Les Corts, José María Llanos (main promoter of the initiative), did so, defending the need for the future norm to include murders since the “convulsive” Second Republic, where “there were religious persecutions and burnings.” of convents” that led to the “fratricidal war between Spaniards.”

More restrained was the PP ombudsman in Les Corts, Miguel Barrachina, who in “X” noted that “the law respects all the rights of 'Memory' and extends them to our democracy, so that the families of the 11 murdered Valencians also by ETA with its unsolved crimes, have the same rights.”