Lufthansa will bring back the A380

Airfare fans love the A380 superjumbo because of its spacious interior, large size, and quiet experience.

Oliver Thansan
Oliver Thansan
01 July 2022 Friday 19:16
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Lufthansa will bring back the A380

Airfare fans love the A380 superjumbo because of its spacious interior, large size, and quiet experience. However, Airbus announced that it would be ending production in 2019.

The demise of the largest passenger aircraft in the world was costly to operate. However, Lufthansa, a German airline, has announced plans to redeploy this massive plane starting in summer 2023.

Lufthansa released a statement Monday saying that the aircraft would be returning due to "the steep rise in customer demand" and delayed delivery of the ordered aircraft. It also noted that the A380 is still popular with both its crew and passengers.

Superjumbo returns

Lufthansa sold six A380s in the past two years, and it still has eight superjumbos. These aircraft are currently stored in deep storage in France and Spain.

According to the German flag carrier, it is still evaluating how many A380s will be activated and is trying to determine what routes they might fly.

Superjumbos are often used by airlines on popular long-haul routes. They are expensive to operate due to their size, so it is important to have a demand for them.

Although the A380 seemed to be in decline over the past few years, Lufthansa's decision indicates that the A380 is not yet extinct. Superjumbos are still available in the fleets of British Airways, Singapore Airlines, Emirates and Qantas as well as Qantas, Qatar Airways.

Emirates President Tim Clark stated that the final A380 would be delivered in December 2021.

Singapore Airlines acknowledged the popularity of the superjumbo last year when it announced plans to restore the aircraft. CNN Travel's Siva Govindasamy, head of global public affairs at Singapore Airlines, stated that some people book the A380 to fly on it.

An Airbus A380 completed a test flight earlier this year powered by Sustainable Aviation Fuel or SAF. This fuel is primarily made from used cooking oil and other waste fats and operates on a single Rolls-Royce Trent 900 motor.