SpaceX launches rocket from NASA's historic moon pad

A SpaceX rocket soared from NASA's long-idled moonshot pad Sunday, sending up space station supplies from the precise spot exactly where astronauts embarked on the lunar landings nearly a half-century ago. It was the first flight from NASA's legendary Launch...

SpaceX launches rocket from NASA's historic moon pad

A SpaceX rocket soared from NASA's long-idled moonshot pad Sunday, sending up space station supplies from the precise spot exactly where astronauts embarked on the lunar landings nearly a half-century ago. It was the first flight from NASA's legendary Launch...

28 February 2017 Tuesday 19:00
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SpaceX launches rocket from NASA's historic moon pad

A SpaceX rocket soared from NASA's long-idled moonshot pad Sunday, sending up space station supplies from the precise spot exactly where astronauts embarked on the lunar landings nearly a half-century ago.

It was the first flight from NASA's legendary Launch Complex 39A since the shuttle program ended practically six years ago, and SpaceX's initially liftoff from Florida considering that a rocket explosion final summer time.

The crowds at Kennedy Space Center watched eagerly as the unmanned Falcon 9 rocket took flight with a cargo ship bound for the International Space Station. They got barely ten seconds of viewing prior to clouds swallowed up the Falcon as it thundered skyward.

As an extra unique treat, SpaceX landed its leftover booster back at Cape Canaveral eight minutes soon after liftoff, a feat achieved only twice just before. Most of SpaceX's eight effective booster landings — rocket recycling at its finest — have made use of ocean platforms. As they did for the duration of the shuttle era, sonic booms heralded Sunday's return.

SpaceX personnel at organization flight headquarters in Southern California cheered as the 15-story booster landed upright at its designated parking spot at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

SpaceX chief Elon Musk celebrated the productive touchdown through Twitter.

"Baby came back," he tweeted.

The celebratory roar grew when the Dragon cargo ship effectively reached orbit a couple minutes later. It will attain the space station Wednesday, delivering 5,500 pounds of meals, clothes and experiments.

It was SpaceX's second launch attempt in a row. Saturday's effort was foiled by final-minute rocket issues. The repairs paid off, and even the clouds parted sufficient to ensure a safe flight.

Musk said he's honored to use Launch Complicated 39A. The business hopes to launch astronauts from this quite spot next year, bringing U.S. crew launches back to dwelling soil immediately after a longer-than-intended hiatus. SpaceX Mars missions, initial robots then people, could follow from here.

If the pad weathered Sunday's launch properly, one more Falcon could be standing there for a satellite send-up in just two weeks.

Kennedy Space Center's director Robert Cabana, a former shuttle commander who flew 4 times from 39A, is thrilled to see the pad made use of for commercial flights like this "alternatively of just sitting out there and rusting away." It's a stark contrast, he noted, to the depression that followed the final shuttle mission in 2011.

"It's just really an fascinating time," Cabana stated just just before liftoff.

It was a momentous comeback for SpaceX. The final time SpaceX had a rocket prepared to fly from Cape Canaveral, it blew up on a neighboring pad during prelaunch testing on Sept. 1. While the enterprise effectively returned to flight last month from California, the focus was on getting leased Launch Complicated 39A ready for action provided that the pad with the accident was left unusable. The broken pad should be back in action later this year.

Constructed in the mid-1960s for the enormous Saturn V moon rockets, Launch Complex 39A has now seen 95 launches. Apollo 11's Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins left Earth from here on July 16, 1969, on the initially moon-landing mission. The quite first space shuttle pilots, John Young and Robert Crippen, soared from right here on April 12, 1981. And in a grand shuttle finale, Atlantis took off from here on July 8, 2011.

NASA signed over 39A to SpaceX in 2014 below a 20-year lease.

SpaceX has spent tens of millions of dollars to make 39A Falcon-ready. By the time astronauts climb into a Dragon capsule to fly to the space station, Shotwell stated, pad renovations will exceed $100 million.

Last week, the U.S. Government Accountability Office warned the industrial crew launches by SpaceX and Boeing are at danger of slipping into 2019. "The hell we will not fly just before 2019," SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell told reporters in response.

In a tweet Saturday, Musk stated the business has currently "retired" so a great deal analysis and improvement danger on the crew Dragon capsule "that I really feel extremely confident of 2018."

As for the second-stage steering problem that cropped up Saturday, SpaceX hustled to replace an engine aspect just before Sunday morning's try. Musk said he personally referred to as Saturday's launch off, saying he was unwilling to threat something going wrong.

For SpaceX staff long accustomed to breaking new ground, Sunday was "a big deal for us," according to SpaceX's Dragon mission manager, Jessica Jensen.

"I'm sure the team will be out celebrating," Jensen told reporters. "We'll be out tonight if you want to locate us."

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Online:

SpaceX: http://www.spacex.com/

NASA: https://www.nasa.gov/

Our editors found this article on this site using Google and regenerated it for our readers.

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Grant 2017-03-01 02:12:55

Astounding, how poor the language is in this article.