An Instagram influencer was sent 'hundreds of' obscene images

One social media influencer claimed that she was the victim of cyber-flashing over the past 10 years.

An Instagram influencer was sent 'hundreds of' obscene images

One social media influencer claimed that she was the victim of cyber-flashing over the past 10 years.

Esat Zorkun
Esat Zorkun
14 December 2021 Tuesday 12:54
309 Reads
An Instagram influencer was sent 'hundreds of' obscene images

Podcaster Jess Davies from Penarth Vale of Glamorgan said that she received hundreds of uninvited obscene images.

Cyber-flashing is becoming a criminal offense as part of tougher laws regarding online safety.

According to the UK government, its plans will "force social media companies out of online abuse."

Jess, with 151,000 Instagram followers, stated that she has become almost "numb” to the images being sent to her. She added: "What's illegal offline should also be illegal online."

Cyber-flashing is 'likely to be made illegal

Unwanted nudes must be sent 'as a standalone crime'

Twitter says that online safety plans should be more clear

"I'm probably cyber-flashed each month, possibly more depending on what I share.

"This has been going for 10 years. These images have probably been sent to me in the hundreds. Close-ups or images of them performing a sex act are the kind of things I receive.

"When you receive the images, it makes you feel dirty and makes you wonder why you are doing this. They sent them to me. Is it something they've done? She fears that it has been "normalized" online in comparison to what is acceptable in public.

"If you were being fanned by thousands of men in the street, that's illegal. That would be a big problem and a huge discussion. So why are we accepting it online?"

Campaigners claim that cyber-flashing became more common during the pandemic because people spend more time online.

A joint committee of MPs will publish Tuesday its report on the draft Online Safety Bill by the UK government. This bill is aimed at tightening regulations for social media companies.

Although cyber-flashing was not included in the bill's text, campaigners and MPs supporting the change hope that it will be. Prime Minister Boris Johnson said it should be. The campaign to criminalize the act of Cyber-flashing is a personal one.

She was 17 when she was flashed in Cardiff by a man.

"I picked up my dad late at night from the town, and as I was walking towards my dad's restaurant, this man approached me and opened his mouth to me.

"I have never forgotten it. It was a memory that remained with me for so many years. Every time I tell the story, someone says, "Oh, yeah, that happened when I was 19" or on a bus. It's too common.

However, there are some concerns about the bill's passage through Parliament.

Jo Stevens, Labour's shadow Welsh Secretary, argues it is not good enough and requires "a lot more changes."

However, the Cardiff Central MP believes that cyber-flashing would eventually be included in this bill.

She said, "It's an agreement from the prime minister." "We will hold them accountable for this because they have made it clear that it should not be rejected. "The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport stated that: "Our comprehensive online safety regulations will force social media firms to stop online abuse and other unacceptable behaviours on their platforms.

"Failing to act could result in multi-billion-pound fines of up to 10% of their global turnover, and their sites being blocked."

The UK government hopes that the bill will stop illegal content and activity, such as images of child abuse and terrorist material, and hate crimes.

Ministers believe it will help protect children from harmful content and adults from legal but potentially harmful content.

Critics say the bill is harmful to free speech. Others say it fails recognize the high level of online violence against women. The NSPCC stated that it should be strengthened and include children in its focus.

Comments

Warning!

You have to login for comment. If you are not a member? Register now.

Login Sign Up