The Spain of Santos and Esteban

What would you, reader, say about a trading company in which several minority shareholders, holders of between 20% and 25% of the share capital, wanted to separate from it, that is, dissolve and liquidate it to take the liquidation fee? What would you think if, in addition, another shareholder, owner of 40% of the capital, without wanting to dissolve the company, was so disgusted and ashamed of the way it is constituted, that he was in favor of a radical change in the articles of association in structure and governance? And what would you expect, finally, if the remaining shareholder, owner of what is left of the capital, was unable to draw up a strategic plan that was as ambitious as it was realistic, that was a suggestive corporate project? You would certainly think that this company is in death throes and that it will be extinguished as such, and various other companies will take its place.

Oliver Thansan
Oliver Thansan
29 March 2024 Friday 11:08
7 Reads
The Spain of Santos and Esteban

What would you, reader, say about a trading company in which several minority shareholders, holders of between 20% and 25% of the share capital, wanted to separate from it, that is, dissolve and liquidate it to take the liquidation fee? What would you think if, in addition, another shareholder, owner of 40% of the capital, without wanting to dissolve the company, was so disgusted and ashamed of the way it is constituted, that he was in favor of a radical change in the articles of association in structure and governance? And what would you expect, finally, if the remaining shareholder, owner of what is left of the capital, was unable to draw up a strategic plan that was as ambitious as it was realistic, that was a suggestive corporate project? You would certainly think that this company is in death throes and that it will be extinguished as such, and various other companies will take its place. This could only be avoided if the two major shareholders, who between the two far exceed the absolute majority, agreed to move the company forward without undermining anyone and for the benefit of all.

A similar situation is that of Spain today. The separatist parties want this: to separate. They are not fooling anyone. They say it bluntly and show with uninhibited boasting their lack of sense of belonging to Spain, from which derives a proclaimed absence of radical solidarity. For its part, a large sector of the left associates the idea of ​​Spain - as a historical entity and as a political project - with an instrument of domination historically in the hands of the right, because it is designed to serve "those who bring centuries settled on the State" and consider that "their homeland" is "their estate". And the right oscillates between an excess of rhetorical and tremendist patriotism that brings out a tin chest, and a willful avoidance of responsibilities compatible with a self-interested calculation.

In addition, the two major parties, PSOE and PP, authentic organic leaders of this Second Restoration that we are experiencing, are complicit in putting their partisan interests ahead of the general interests of Spain. Thus, when their deputies denigrate and debase themselves in Congress and the Senate, with unworthy language, they are fighting for nothing but power. If they had a strong spirit, love for the country and respect for their fellow citizens, they would not behave in a way that muddies politics.

But we are like this: they don't give for more. And, for this reason, instead of looking for the great pact between them that the gravity of the moment demands, both the PSOE and the PP do not exclude oblique pacts with those who want to liquidate Spain. The PSOE made it clear on the same night of July 23, when, after taking stock, its leader said the sacred words - "We are more" -, thinking of a fruitful rapprochement with the separatists, which has been consummated with excess

And there are those who suggest that the PP will run a similar exciting adventure, agreeing with Junts a motion of censure against the current president in exchange for who knows what. Perhaps this is a lie, but perhaps it has more scope than it seems, since a possible PP-Junts understanding has been suggested for days in certain environments and by certain media. Perhaps this dream is what Alejandro Fernández has questioned.

However, these dark works of arranging shameful pacts with the separatists, even if they are productive according to the spurious optics of the struggle for power, need, given their peculiar nature, negotiators of a special skill. Santos Cerdán León, Navarrese from Milagro, and Esteban González Pons, Valencian from Valencia, seem to meet this requirement. Cerdán was the negotiator of the marketing signed with Puigdemont in Brussels. And González Pons could be the interlocutor of the PP with Junts to arrange a possible pact, as he was before Feijóo's failed investiture.

I do not go into the adequacy of these two politicians to carry out such a complex task. But I think that, in any case, his prominence sets the current tone of Spanish politics. That is why today we could talk about the Spain of Santos and Esteban.