Police warn: don't you ever do

learn from his mistakes, it is said. But one can also learn from the mistakes of others. The police have countless times warned about bogus text messages and he

Police warn: don't you ever do

learn from his mistakes, it is said. But one can also learn from the mistakes of others. The police have countless times warned about bogus text messages and he

Ann McDonald
Ann McDonald
06 February 2020 Thursday 15:00
22 Reads
Police warn: don't you ever do

learn from his mistakes, it is said. But one can also learn from the mistakes of others. The police have countless times warned about bogus text messages and here on the Extra Leaf, we have written about several cases where people have been injured.

Now is so mad again.

on Wednesday received the east Jutland Police a review from a 27-year-old woman in Aarhus, who the day before had received a text that looked as if it came from the 'Digitalpost'. In the text message said that she had received a new digital post from the Nets, but when she logged on to the e-Box, there were no unread messages, writes the police in a press release.

instead tapped the woman on the link in the text message, after which she was asked to upload a picture of his Friends.

on Wednesday morning, she could see that there were made three strakshævninger on her bank account between 1000 and 5000 crowns.

Police calls, never press on links in sms that come from a sender you do not know with certainty.

It was not the only review about the fake sms, police received Wednesday. A 16-year-old woman, who had an Iphone for sale, met with his buyer in Celebrity Gallery on Tuesday evening.

'They met as agreed at the 20-time and when the buyer showed a picture of the shipment, and the girl at the same time got a sms from 'Danske Bank', which confirmed the transfer, she transferred the phone to the buyer. When the girl subsequently contacted his own bank, she was told that the sms was false, and that there was no transfer of money', writes the police in a press release.

It is not the first time that the police encountered on this approach, and they advise people to check his bank account, before you provide a commodity.

Several readers have tipped the Extra Blade on the svindelmetoder involving e-Box and the use of NemID. Here a sent to example, where the sender appears to be 'Sydbank'.

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Updated: 06.02.2020 15:00
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