Workers of Julio Torres, brother of the architect Joaquín Torres, protest with a pan over non-payments

The dispute between Julio Torres, brother of the famous architect Joaquín Torres, and his workers has reached a climax with a public protest in the form of a cacerolada that was experienced live within the framework of the program 'And now Sonsoles'.

Oliver Thansan
Oliver Thansan
14 May 2024 Tuesday 11:16
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Workers of Julio Torres, brother of the architect Joaquín Torres, protest with a pan over non-payments

The dispute between Julio Torres, brother of the famous architect Joaquín Torres, and his workers has reached a climax with a public protest in the form of a cacerolada that was experienced live within the framework of the program 'And now Sonsoles'. Amid accusations of non-payment, employees denounce a situation of financial precariousness that affects multiple labor sectors.

The recent statements by Juan Torres, father of both brothers, regarding the judicial conflict with Julio have opened a new dimension in this family saga. Juan Torres, in an exclusive interview for ABC, has described Julio as a “fraud” and has revealed the critical economic situation that he faces after discovering alleged financial embezzlements. This scenario has caused a rift between the members of the Torres family, exacerbating pre-existing tension.

The statements of Maite Torres, Joaquín's sister, in 'And now Sonsoles' have added more fuel to the fire, expressing her frustration with Julio's attitude and lack of willingness to reach an amicable agreement. Maite has publicly denounced that Julio “triples” the figures proposed in negotiation attempts, which reinforces the perception that the situation is far from being resolved peacefully.

In the context of these revelations, workers from companies linked to Julio Torres have taken to the streets in a cacerolada to demand payment of owed salaries. Jaime Molinos, spokesperson for the employees, has stated that Julio Torres “owes around 30 million euros to his workers among the entire family network,” pointing out a financial crisis that directly impacts the job stability of numerous people.

The workers' call reflects a situation of desperation and economic vulnerability that has led to direct action as a last resort. Meanwhile, the implications of this economic and family crisis continue to resonate in the public sphere, raising questions about the future of both Julio Torres' companies and the family relationships between the Torreses.