The tracksuit as a symptom

Meteorologist Tomàs Molina announces that he will run for election on the ERC lists.

Oliver Thansan
Oliver Thansan
01 April 2024 Monday 04:21
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The tracksuit as a symptom

Meteorologist Tomàs Molina announces that he will run for election on the ERC lists. He promises a Molina Commitment, which, despite the significance of its name, is part of the tradition of good intentions, usually belied by reality. The temptation to compare the weather forecast and the electoral spectacle invites us to recover the statement of the journalist and comedian Philippe Bouvard: “Meteorology is a science that allows us to know what the weather should have been.”

Politics – and especially Catalan politics – also works like this: diagnoses are announced that are then reviewed with the recurring interpretation of satanic Spanish sabotage. What should have been done is put before what has actually been done. Thus a frustration is consolidated that feeds the increasingly flaccid muscles of hope and the feeling of being trapped by an incompetent political and administrative reality.

In Venezuela, the electoral furor also includes newsworthy particularities. For years, Nicolás Maduro has been enlivening the campaigns with, among other things, clothing contributions such as the use of chromatically colorful tracksuits (he even wore one from Barça). The custom of the Venezuelan tracksuit comes from afar, but it cannot be ruled out that it will end up being imposed as an electoral costume. Vogue magazine asked a few days ago “How has the tracksuit become the fashion obsession of 2024?” Balenciaga, Loewe and Gucci include tracksuits in their shows.

The images of the singer Mushka saying that Catalan should not impose itself aggressively have also circulated with the turbo of telltale slander, out of time and context, so typical of our time and, oh surprise, we found that she is wearing a tracksuit. The first candidate with possibilities (Salvador Illa, Pere Aragonès, Carles Puigdemont) who appears in an electoral debate wearing a tracksuit – are you up for it, Molina? – will obtain additional, free media attention, which will be acclaimed by the new media manipulation channels. masses and will connect with – ora pro nobis – the young public.

In Cope, Carlos Herrera regrets that so many Holy Week processions have had to be suspended due to bad weather and the ravages of Storm Nelson. He also explains that, during the return operation, there were endless caravans of electric cars waiting their turn to recharge their batteries. The sale of electric cars does not coincide with the infrastructure of charging points, another scam between the principles of supply and demand. The other day a taxi driver told me that every day he spends an hour charging the battery of his vehicle. There may be a niche market here: large stores with many charging points that, at the same time, offer food, drinks, massages, manicures, tattoos and the sale of tracksuits.