Snapshots of a Few of the more than 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19 in America

Over 500,000 Americans have died from COVID-19.

Snapshots of a Few of the more than 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19 in America

Over 500,000 Americans have died from COVID-19.

TheEditor
TheEditor
27 February 2021 Saturday 08:03
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Snapshots of a Few of the more than 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19 in America

The coronavirus has taken the lives of over 500,000 Americans and counting.

Those we have dropped come from all backgrounds and comprise the most people -- first responders and health care employees -- who've been working diligently and selflessly to stem the wave of this disease and care for those ill. However, the virus has also emphasized the disparities from the U.S. -- carrying a disproportionate toll on communities of colour, the elderly and the poor.

Here's a look at a Few of the lives lost:

"Officer Britt enjoyed being a police officer and cared about the community that he served," the division stated.

Britt graduated in the Arizona Law Enforcement Academy in 2001 and spent another seven decades as a patrol officer. Then he spent 10 years working in the DUI Unit. In 2018, Britt returned as a patrol officer and acted as a mentor for younger officers,'' the division stated.

"He was enthusiastic about his occupation and touched millions of people's lives over the span of his profession," Chief Sean Duggan explained in a statement. "His passing is a huge loss to our division and also the Chandler community"

Alicia Martinez, a 21-year-old social work grad student at Baylor University, died on Jan. 17, 2021.

She was put to graduate this May, the college said.

The Waco, Texas, native got her associate's degree at McLennan Community College and her undergraduate degree from Baylor this past year. 1 faculty member explained Martinez as the"heartbeat of the classroom," based on Baylor President Linda Livingstone.

She wished to follow a career in social work to"empowerpeople and communities," Livingstone said.

Vania Underwood, a 36-year-old Ohio nurse, mother and wife, died on Dec. 19, 2020, The Toledo Blade reported.

Underwood graduated from nursing school and began working about a year ago, before the pandemic started, the Blade reported.

"We had each other's back the whole time," fellow nurse Brock Bowman told the paper. "She left the change a bit more fun. It made it a lot easier to make it through the evening."

AAJA President Michelle Ye Hee Lee known as Lee, 73,"a trailblazer whose livelihood was instrumental to our collective understanding and appreciation of their background, triumphs and conflicts of Asian America."

"He seized crucial minutes in Asian American history, such as the protests surrounding the 1982 murder of Vincent Chin," that the AAJA explained. "Corky said he had been motivated to become a photographer after he could not find one Chinese face in the audience of a renowned 1869 picture celebrating the completion of the transcontinental rail, despite the numerous Chinese employees involved. Back in 2002, he recreated the photograph this time, with descendants of the Chinese employees who'd been left again on the 150th anniversary of the conclusion of this railroad."

Lee, who had been born in Queens, New York, to Chinese immigrant parents, died in precisely the exact same borough, The New York Times reported. He was predeceased by his wife in 2001, '' the Times stated.

Amelia"Terry" Martinez, a sergeant with the Los Angeles Police Department, served the division for over 27 Decades.

The 53-year-old expired on Jan. 12, Los Angeles ABC channel KABC reported.

"She was adored by the officers and the community," explained Rick Stabile, controlling officer to the LAPD's Hollenbeck region.

Martinez leaves three kids, KABC reported.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom said,"Her bravery, decades of service to the people of Los Angeles and sacrifice won't ever be forgotten"

Carol Stevenson, 80, and Albert"Bert" Stevenson, 77, both expired on Jan. 8.

The couple was married for 2 decades, Albert Stevenson's daughter, Sharolyn Hoffman, told ABC News.

"They have married later in life following previous unions. And therefore, I believe they finally discovered their love game, and they had been doing what they were able to live out it the very best they can," Hoffman explained. "They were undergoing their thankfully."

"Our families combined perfectly," Hoffman explained. "She [Carol] had two women. There were three people -- my brother and my sister and I -- then most of us have children, and a few of Carol's grandkids have children. Thus, when they have married, everybody came and it was fantastic."

Since the few scrapped COVID-19,'' Hoffman said the hospital team place them in precisely the exact same room.

"They were holding hands before the end," she explained.

Betty Grier Gallaher has been an emergency room nurse in Coosa Valley Medical Center at Alabama, where she worked for 43 decades.

"Mrs. Betty always had a grin on her head and has been our encourager," Amy Price, CNO/COO in Coosa Valley Medical Center, said in a statement. "She embodied our bill to take care of patients- head, body, and soul. She was always tender and cared deeply for her patients."

"The best description I have heard someone make about my mother is that she had been born for a nurse," her son, Carson Grier Jr., told ABC's Birmingham affiliate, WBMA-LD. "She had been gonna train as many nurses as she possibly could."

She died on Jan. 10, 1 day ahead of her 79th birthday, at the hospital in which she cared for patients for a lot of decades, WBMA reported.

"Her idea design was,'I have only got to make [it] to this vaccine,'" her son explained.

Howell has been"a consummate law enforcement specialist and dedicated husband and father" who leaves behind his wife and five kids, the department stated.

Henry County Sheriff Reginald B. Scandrett said the 36-year-old was a humble,"calm guy" who"always had a strategy," ABC Atlanta affiliate WSB reported.

"As his loved ones told me... he did all," the sheriff said in his memorial service, based on The Atlanta Journal Constitution. "He cared for all."

Braden Wilson, a 15-year-old pupil at Santa Susana High School at California, died on Jan. 5, that the Ventura County Star reported.

He had been involved in theatre, movie creation and choir, reported ABC Los Angeles station KABC.

Among his instructors, Luke Golden, stated,"Braden was among the kindest and most generous students I have taught in my own career. ... Not only was kind, he was smart and creative. The movies he made in my course were consistently made together with his distinctive spark of pleasure."

Principal Matt Guzzo stated,"He exhibited great kindness and thoughtfulness for others. He was hard-working and he joined easily to a number of the pupils and staff from the Art programs."

"Braden was a unique young man.

Arnold Herrera, a 19-year-old without a previous health conditions, expired on Jan. 3, his family told ABC Chicago station WLS.

Herrera graduated in 2019 in Chicago's Benito Juárez Community Academy where he had been a cadet at the Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps program and the Career and Technical Education (CTE) Automotive program, the faculty said.

"Arnold was treasured as a pupil and as a Individual," Primary Juan Carlos Ocon said in a statement to ABC News. "Arnold was exceptionally kind and talented."

"Arnold loved to play with the drums and the guitarhe loved to use his hands and discovered his enthusiasm as an automotive technician," Ocon stated. "While in Juarez, he made his ASE certificate in Electric and Brake systems," Ocon stated. "After graduation, Arnold began working in Hyundai as a proficient technician and recently made his Hyundai Technician Certification. Last week, he achieved to the faculty to get a reference as he'd applied to an apprenticeship to get Automotive Local 701 Union."

Simone Parker, who taught mathematics for 19 years in a Kentucky high school, expired on Jan. 2 at age 46, The Louisville Courier-Journal reported.

"Mrs. Parker was loved and loved by all her students, whom she constantly known as'my kids.' Everyday since they left she told them'be good, be careful and come back to me '"

"Her fellow instructors and staff will forever miss her incredible presence, the college said.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear tweeted,"Simone created an effect on her students, in and outside of the classroom, changing their lives for the better"

Patricia Weissenborn, 100 years old, expired May 1, her obituary said.

"Witty and emotionally sharp to the conclusion, Weissenborn attributed her longevity to white zinfandel," The Washington Post reported.

When Weissenborn was a kid, her father died of pneumonia, and her mother took in boarders to support the family through the Depression, The Post reported.

"She was quite resilient, very demanding," among her brothers, Tina Villeneuve, told the Post. It is really decision."

Weissenborn leaves four daughters and eight grandchildren.

In 2015, ABC News covered the minute the then-92-year-old Benning obtained his high school degree.

Benning was only 17 when he was drafted to serve in World War II and he abandoned his Ohio hometown to function overseas. Six decades back, Benning was"thrilled" if the faculty secretary arrived at the home and sent his cap and gown to himJenkins said at the moment.

Jenkins called his late-night an"American hero"

"Together with his oral history at the Library of Congress, and above 40 decades of serving the United States army, that is the real definition of an American Patriot," Jenkins told ABC News.

He died on June 4 at Age 53, The Washington Post reported.

Williams was an elementary school custodian prior to linking the D.C. authorities, and he spent much of his career training pupils, the Post reported.

"Whether on the foot beat or in a hallway at school, he made it his business to understand every individual, whether it had been the neighborhood shop owner or a teacher," Police Chief Peter Newsham said at his funeral, even according to the Post. "He took medicine to older members of this community when they could not get into the pharmacy. He checked in on colleges, he also coached basketball and aided in the cafeteria at lunch," Nesham explained. "He was the type of committed police officer that every community needs."

Williams leaves behind his wife of 27 decades.

Keywords:
COVID-19
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