Serbia raises the alert of its Army to the maximum for the tension in Kosovo

The Serbian president, Aleksandar Vucic, described this Tuesday as "difficult and dynamic" his contacts with the international community to try to defuse the situation in Kosovo, and as "hysterical" the pressure for the Kosovar Serbs to lift the blockade of the roads they maintain in the north of the former Serbian province that became independent in 2008.

NewsEditor
NewsEditor
27 December 2022 Tuesday 09:30
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Serbia raises the alert of its Army to the maximum for the tension in Kosovo

The Serbian president, Aleksandar Vucic, described this Tuesday as "difficult and dynamic" his contacts with the international community to try to defuse the situation in Kosovo, and as "hysterical" the pressure for the Kosovar Serbs to lift the blockade of the roads they maintain in the north of the former Serbian province that became independent in 2008.

"We must advocate for the interests of the (Kosovo) Serb people, they are not on the barricades for nothing," Vucic told reporters.

The president accused Pristina of restricting the rights of the Kosovar Serb population and violating or failing to comply with the agreements reached, arguing that the objective of the central government is to get members of that minority to leave Kosovar territory.

He also accused the international community of tolerating and supporting Pristina in this alleged behavior, and despite its threats to forcibly remove the barricades that the Kosovar Serbs have maintained in northern Kosovo since last the 10th in protest against what they consider a growing discrimination.

"We have included all the resources (in talks with the international community), we do the maximum to preserve peace and reach a compromise solution," the president said.

He assured that "any window is being sought so that Serbs can wait in their homes for Christmas" Orthodox, which Serbian Orthodox Christians celebrate on January 7.

He also criticized as "a great shame" the international community's lack of condemnation of Pristina's decision to ban the patriarch of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Porfirije, from entering Kosovo.

The top Serbian religious leader had plans to visit Serbian Orthodox believers and monasteries and churches in Kosovo from December 26 to 28, many of which are medieval, including the headquarters of the former Orthodox Patriarchate in Pec (west).

Porfirije, considered peaceful and tolerant, is known for his calls for peace and reconciliation of Serbs and Albanians in Kosovo.

Serbia does not recognize the independence of Kosovo, proclaimed by the Kosovar Albanian majority in 2008 after the 1998/99 war and the repression of Belgrade in the 1990s by Kosovar Albanian separatism.

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