Pandemic Olympics survived heat, and now a Typhoon is on its way

The sun was first. Then, the wind and rain.

Pandemic Olympics survived heat, and now a Typhoon is on its way

The sun was first. Then, the wind and rain.

TheEditor
TheEditor
26 July 2021 Monday 14:31
383 Reads
Pandemic Olympics survived heat, and now a Typhoon is on its way

After being delayed by the pandemic, the Tokyo Olympics are now open under the oppressive heat. A typhoon is expected to arrive Tuesday morning and disrupt at least some of the Games.

Andrew Knewstubb, a New Zealand rugby sevens player, said that it felt like they were trying to prepare for everything.

Japanese hosts assure that the incoming storm is a low-grade tropical storm in U.S. terms. Tsurigasaki beach surfers believe that Tropical Storm Nepartak could improve competition, provided it doesn't directly hit the beach.

However, archery rowing, sailing and rowing have already modified their Tuesday schedules. Masa Takaya, spokesperson for Tokyo Games, stated that no other changes were expected.

Takaya stated that it was a tropical storm with three grades out of five. She shouldn't be worried, but it is still a typhoon according to Japan interpretation. This is the weakest category but it is still a Typhoon so we shouldn't be too optimistic about its impact.

The competitors are looking for a change in the weather, so long as it doesn't bring down the wind and rain. They will be located about 90 miles east from Tokyo. Low tide caused Monday's surfing competition to be delayed. However, if the storm strikes as predicted, waves could be twice as high as anticipated.

Kurt Korte (official Olympic surfing forecaster) said, "As a homeowner, I say, "Oh no, stay away!" "But, as a surfer, I say, 'OK. You can form if your stay out there.' Everyone can agree that a storm in the distance is the best.

According to the Japan Meteorological Agency, Nepartak was heading northwest over the Pacific Ocean east Japan on Monday. Landfall is expected Tuesday afternoon. Strong winds could cause the storm to bring heavy rains and waves across Japan's northeastern regions. It could drop up to 5.9 inches (150 m) of rain.

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