“It really hurts, I'm sorry.”

Yesterday I reviewed the video: I saw again Antonio Barrul, a professional boxer, beating an abuser.

Oliver Thansan
Oliver Thansan
15 May 2024 Wednesday 10:31
3 Reads
“It really hurts, I'm sorry.”

Yesterday I reviewed the video: I saw again Antonio Barrul, a professional boxer, beating an abuser.

Ten days have passed since that moment, and I'm still thinking about it.

The episode seems designed in 3D. It took place on the stage of a cinema in León. The audience, mostly creatures, watched Garfield. Sitting in his armchair, the abuser spent half an hour shaking his partner. He then started hitting her. In the arreón, he also hit a girl, and there, Antonio Barrul couldn't take it anymore.

Barrul was not the security guard, nor the usher, but another spectator: he stood up - ignoring the requests of his wife and daughter, who asked him to sit down - and went down to the stalls, which is where he had stood. the abuser Garfield disappeared from the scene: we went to 3D.

In the presence of the entire forum, the abuser insulted the boxer, and the boxer shook him really well, right-left, all looking for the stomach, and the matter concluded with the abuser body to the ground and Barrul apologizing to the audience:

–Really, it hurts me, I'm sorry.

A spectator recorded the scene on her mobile phone and the thing went viral.

The abuser felt mistreated and has denounced Barrul, an issue that complicates life for everyone, including justice, which is rigid by definition. On YouTube, the different versions have hundreds of thousands of views and dozens of comments. For the most part, the reflections applaud Barrul:

–The difference between a trash and a heartthrob.

–This is what this twisted world lacks, empathy with the abused and punishment for the abusers...

The Castilla y León Boxing Federation has also said that Barrul's license is not in danger.

(This federation decision is especially exceptional: it is assumed that a boxer can lose his permission to box the moment he gets involved in a fight that takes place outside the ring.)

The world is on the fighter's side.

And yet, the man is not sleeping. It seems that the abuser is short of funds, so he is demanding an out-of-court settlement. If he wants to avoid a criminal record, including a prison sentence of between three months and two years, Antonio Barrul will have to dig deep into his pocket. He will have to pay the guy who goes around hitting women.

If one day I sat before Barrul, I would like to ask him:

–If the scene were repeated, would you beat the abuser again?