City apologizes for saying that 'a lot people probably don’t want to celebrate the nation’

Orlando, Florida, has apologized for a statement it made that asked if July Fourth celebrations are appropriate after "division and hate" across the country.

NewsEditor
NewsEditor
04 July 2022 Monday 14:20
6 Reads
City apologizes for saying that 'a lot people probably don’t want to celebrate the nation’

Orlando, Florida, has apologized for a statement it made that asked if July Fourth celebrations are appropriate after "division and hate" across the country.

This statement was published in an email newsletter promoting the city's annual Fireworks at the Fountain 2022 event. It is scheduled for beginning at 4 p.m.

"A lot people don't want us to celebrate our nation right at the moment, and we don't blame them. Why would anyone want to celebrate any of the divisions, hatred and unrest in this country? The statement was made.

Some people, including conservative politicians and local residents, took to social media to protest the email. Ron DeSantis, a local police union representing 800 officers, took to social media protesting what they called its "disrespectful and inflamatory" tone.

Officials issued an apology on behalf of the city via Facebook and Twitter a day later. It attracted thousands of comments and likes.

The statement stated that "The City of Orlando deeply regrets the adverse impact our words had on some residents in our community." We are sorry that these words offend some residents. This was not our intention. We are grateful for the freedoms we enjoy in this country, and thank the men and women who fought for them. To show our gratitude and to honor the country that we live in, we celebrate the 4th of July.

However, the apology was not enough to silence all criticism.

One Facebook user responded to the apology by saying, "Very sad that such a level of disrespect for our nation has infected this City in this manner." "So very, very disappointing and embarrassing for our City."

Another said: "It's because we have our independence that it is possible to disagree, voice and encourage our government be of the people by the people and for the people-not just those with whom our agreement. There's so much to be proud of.

Others cheered the original statement. Some described it as humorous and honest, while others pointed out the recent Supreme Court decision to overrule Roe v. Wade, as an example of America's "division". Recent NPR/PBS/Marist polls found that 56% of Americans oppose the decision.

"You expressed what many of us think and feel to others," one Facebook user wrote under the city's apology. "You should not only apologize but you should also be applauded because you raised what so many of our feelings."

Another wrote, "I thought that the message was 100% on target." "I was happy to see that government was acknowledging the divisions and unrest I feel every day. My house has no flag this year."

Florida's "Don't Say Gay," as critics call it, was implemented Friday. It prohibits instruction about sexual orientation and gender identity in kindergarten through grade 3. Some teachers and students of LGBTQ have complained that the law has caused division.

The law's supporters argue that it applies only to children from kindergarten to third grade, and that the law's purpose is to give parents greater control over their children's education.

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