Camilo: “My music is a meeting place for diversity”

Colombian singer Camilo, one of today's great Latin pop figures, lands today in Barcelona (Palau Sant Jordi, 9:30 p.

NewsEditor
NewsEditor
26 June 2022 Sunday 00:14
3 Reads
Camilo: “My music is a meeting place for diversity”

Colombian singer Camilo, one of today's great Latin pop figures, lands today in Barcelona (Palau Sant Jordi, 9:30 p.m.), as part of the Inside Out Tour, name that will bring his next album to be released in September. The Latin star (Medellín, 1994), also very popular for his numerous collaborations with Shawn Méndez, Pedro Capó or recently with Alejandro Sanz, will feature collaborations during the concert such as that of his partner Evaluna Montaner.

Last year's tour, Mis Manos Tour, was the most profitable of the year in Spain. Did you learn something?

It was my first tour of my life, my first meeting with the public, and the first country I visited was Spain. Everything was new and the simple energy of the first meeting was enough to liven everything up. Obviously, this tour is much more ambitious in terms of production and staging. Apart from that, as a Colombian singer-songwriter, being able to travel the world with my songs is a privilege.

Do you feel like an ambassador of Colombian music?

This label gives me a very big responsibility. My country is an exporter of quality and sound, and there is so much musical wealth in it that my songs are the honest and respectful interaction with it. Of course there are other things that are more faithful to the roots, and there are so many artists that are so good and that leave their name so high, but I am proud to be able to say that I feel part of a new generation of artists in Colombia. Yes indeed.

Do you agree when you hear that you are considered the friendly face of Latin urban music?

I have never said that but I respect it. But my music is a product of the person that I am, and I think music should be as close to me as possible. The best way to be me is to do what I do, that is, in the same way that I celebrate honesty and diversity, I celebrate that there is a space for my music and for the way I share mine. In this sense, in no way do I think there is something negative in the way other fellow artists do what they do; On the contrary, I feel very fortunate to be able to be part of what is happening now in the Latin music industry, in urban music.

There are reggaeton lyrics, for example, that…

There have to be songs that immortalize and put everything that is happening in a frame, just like movies or books. Art has to immortalize everything and I'm glad there's room for everyone. I don't think we should all be uniform and look like each other.

You say that the source of your music is God.

More than seeing it in a mythological way or that God is behind my actions, I believe that the day-to-day experience that we all share is something much deeper than just the material experience. I believe that there are things beyond the everyday, and that these energies are alive and present. And from that place I feel my inspiration is born. It is very difficult to be inspired and sensitized to write and have creativity if you are not awake and connected with the deepest part of yourself. And the deepest is described by things that are intangible and sacred to each person. There are those who call that profound thing, or energy, or universe sacred, and other people call it God. I only know that as I move away from that root, my inspiration shrinks.

Is there a common thread in your songs?

It is very difficult for me to define myself, but there are some common factors in my songs that are above all honesty, and also love, which for me is like a revolution worth getting up for every day.

Why are your songs so intergenerational?

The interesting thing about all this is that it was, is, an uncalculated surprise. I feel lucky that my songs are part of the lives of such diverse people, not only in age but with different histories, genres, social classes, politics. My music is a meeting place for diversity.

Posting on social networks that you and your wife Evaluna were going to be parents means sharing your private life with millions of people. What do you think?

There is a corner of ours, of our intimacy, which only we try to enter, which we guard with great zeal. But people have been so generous to me that when we found out we were pregnant, the first thing we thought about was how we were going to tell the people we love and value. It was a part of the privilege to be able to tell this great family, rather than a matter of profiting from publicity.

Comments

Warning!

You have to login for comment. If you are not a member? Register now.

Login Sign Up