According to Ukraine, 15 people were killed and 24 others were trapped when a Russian missile struck an apartment building.

Officials said that at least 15 people were killed in the attack by Russian missiles on eastern Ukraine.

NewsEditor
NewsEditor
10 July 2022 Sunday 07:19
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According to Ukraine, 15 people were killed and 24 others were trapped when a Russian missile struck an apartment building.

Officials said that at least 15 people were killed in the attack by Russian missiles on eastern Ukraine. They also destroyed a portion of an apartment building with five floors.

A video and photos of what looked like the aftermath of the attack at Chasiv Yar, Donetsk Province showed grim-faced rescuers standing on top of a large pile of rubble. They dug through broken bricks and mangled wire wiring, as well as crumbled cement beams near a partially collapsed building.

Pavlo Kyrylenko (the governor of Donetsk Oblast, eastern Donbas), and the Interior Ministry shared the images.

Kyrylenko stated that the search and rescue operation was continuing. "We have additional evidence of Russia's crimes. They shell residential areas of any community, regardless of whether it's near the frontlines or not."

Kyrylenko stated that at least 24 people, including one 9-year-old boy, may still be in the wreckage. According to the governor, rescuers were able to contact two of them.

According to the Ukrainian state emergency service, 15 victims had been confirmed dead in the attack.

The video shows heavy machinery being heard whistling as rescuers examine tiny crevices within the ruins. A second video was shared by Ukraine's Interior Ministry. It shows rescuers carrying white bags that appear to contain bodies.

"Russians attacked a high-rise apartment block with civilians again," tweeted Andriy Yaermak, chief of staff to the Ukrainian president.

NBC News was unable to confirm the version of events given by Ukrainian officials.

The Kremlin did not immediately respond. NBC News reached Russia's defense ministry to get comment.

Moscow has been accused by Ukraine of firing a barrage missile strikes at its cities in recent weeks. This included a strike on a busy shopping mall in central Ukraine last month and attacking civilians.

Although Moscow denies attacking civilians in Ukraine's conflict, its forces were behind heavy bombardment of major population centers like Mariupol and Kharkiv.

Moscow's attempt to seize control of Ukraine's industrial center in the historical pro-Russian eastern part of the country was reflected in Saturday's missile strike. It occurred as the forces of Russia appeared to be preparing for an intensification their drive west.

As the Ukrainian military reports clashes with Russian troops at frontlines in the east, and south, the missile strike in Chasiv Yar is occurring.

According to military analysts, Russia's offensive in the east is likely to intensify after it took control of Luhansk earlier this month. This set the stage for the next phase.

Luhansk is part of Ukraine's eastern industrial heartland, the Donbas. This has been the main focus of Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion.

Moscow-backed separatists from the Donetsk, Luhansk and other regions of Ukraine fought for eight years against Ukrainian forces in a conflict that claimed thousands of deaths. This conflict was used as a basis by the Kremlin to start the conflict.

Russia could be preparing for a new offensive against its neighbor after celebrating a significant victory in Luhansk.

In its daily update on Ukraine's situation Saturday, the British military stated that Russia was moving its reserves forces across the country and assembling them close to Ukraine in preparation for future offensive operations.

The Institute for the Study of War (a U.S.-based military thinktank) last week stated that Russian forces in Ukraine had entered an "operational Pause" and were still engaging in limited ground attack to create conditions for future offensive operations.

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